chemtrails.cc

What are “chembows?”

by on Jan.25, 2009, under Optical Phenomena, What are they?

If you’ve been paying attention to chemtrails, you may have observed rainbow smearing (diffraction) of light reflected off them.  Dark sunglasses can bring the subtle rainbows into the dynamic range of the human eye.  Chembows are often visible when the sunlight reflects at approximately 45• angle to the chemtrail.  Wikipedia entry on diffraction

A popular chembow image. Notice how only the wispy remnants of the chemtrail diffract the sunlight, <i>not</i> the nearby clouds.

A popular chembow image. Notice how only the wispy remnants of the chemtrail diffract the sunlight, not the clouds.

Diffraction is a quantum interaction between photons of light and edges of atoms.  When metallic surfaces have features smaller than a wavelength of visible light (nanometer scale),  different wavelengths will be reflected at different angles.  When features are ordered in a linear pattern (such as on a DVD optical disc), a rainbow will appear.

Illustration of white light diffracting off a metallic "diffraction grating"

Illustration of white light diffracting off a metallic diffraction grating

Diffraction off the bottom of a metallic optical disc.

In the rain, or other atmospheric conditions where water droplets are large enough, rainbows appear due to refraction.  Atmospheric refraction (such as from a rainbow in a rainstorm) is a similar phenomenon to chemtrail diffraction.  Its important to note, however, that rainbows can be seen in light reflected off chemtrails, not only refracted from behind, which may occur under other atmospheric conditions, such as the presence of large ice crystals or droplets.

Refraction thru a prism (or water droplet of sufficient size). Refraction occurs when light passes thru a surface into a material with different <i>index of refraction</i>

Refraction thru a prism (or water droplet of sufficient size). Refraction occurs when light passes thru a surface into a material with different index of refraction

More examples of chembows:

2556642904_a202f7cf86

Dark sky indicates reduced exposure, necessary to bring rainbow into dynamic range of the sensor.

Filamentous wisps may indicate presence of heavier-than-water particulate aerosol.

Filamentous wisps may indicate presence of heavier-than-water particulate aerosol. Pink and green dominate the rainbow, matching emission spectra of barium.

Be Sociable, Share!
:, ,
4 comments for this entry:
  1. Brendon

    I’ve used an angled mirror (beveled edges) to reflect sunlight through a clear glass jar filled with water. When adding different components to the water (aluminum powder, silica powder, etc) vastly different color spectrums can be observed on the viewing wall behind the jar (just a large flat white board). This simple experiment concurs with your information that different elements in the atmosphere can be responsible for the varying “chembows” we see.

  2. admin

    I’d like to see some video/pics of that.

  3. josh

    i’ve see many times chemical rainbow, and all the times was a heavy spraying day.obviusly there is a connection.

    i think barium is the “main ingredient”,
    but i see with my own eyes strange filaments falling in the sky,probably polymers of some type.
    and i’m not talking about spider’s web or something like that.

    keep up the good work, because the 2009 is the year of the disclosure of the aerosol programs

  4. louis

    i’ve seen these almost every week in san diego. just a little bit different. sometimes the chembows would have a alligator mouth like rainbows.

Leave a Reply

Search

Still can't find what you're looking for? Please post a comment or contact us.